Palisades & Foxhall

District of Columbia Arts Center (DCAC)

2438 18th St NW,

This arts center is home to an art gallery with rotating, high-quality shows by local artists. It also houses a very cool black box theater and special events like avant garde poetry nights.

Habana Village

1834 Columbia Road NW

This Cuban restaurant hosts salsa lessons Wednesdays through Saturdays, complete with fun, energetic music. Just ten dollars buys you a beginner or advanced lesson from 7:15- 9:30 p.m. If you’ve worked up a heavy appetite after your dance lesson (or just in the mood for a delicious meal), you can order from a fine selection of Cuban dishes to complete the Latin experience.

Madam’s Organ

2461 18th St NW

This blues bar boasts live music and soul food. It’s home to a busty, redheaded “Madam”  a funky, bright piece of artwork on the building. At Madam’s Organ, redheaded guests enjoy half-price Rolling Rock beer. Check out the front porch for the best people-watching spot in the neighborhood.

 

Kreeger Museum

2401 Foxhall Rd NW

This private house-museum is a gem not even known to all locals. It is home to an impressive collection of paintings by the impressionist and early modern masters. The house was designed by modernist architects Philip Johnson andRichard Foster and remains its own piece of art.

Hillwood Estate

4155 Linnean Avenue NW

Merriweather Post Hillwood, prominent businesswoman and heiress to the Post Cereal fortune, fashioned her estate in the hopes of becoming an extraordinarily luxurious site for entertaining guests and housing her impressive art collections. The mansion is a treasure trove of French and Russian decorative arts, much of which she obtained from the USSR when Stalin’s government was auctioning off its cultural heritage to finance war efforts. The French and Japanese-style gardens are also not to be missed.

National Cathedral (Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul)

3001 Wisconsin Ave NW

The world’s sixth largest cathedral was created over a period of 83 years from 150,000 tons of stone. Catch a tour to see the inside, as towers and the crypt are off limits without a guide during the busy season. An organ demonstrations is spectacular, but the cathedral also hosts children’s programming and major concerts.

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception 

400 Michigan Ave NE

This Byzantine-style Roman Catholic Church has more than 75,000 square feet of colorful mosaics, including one of the world’s largest of Jesus Christ in the North Apse of the Upper Church. The Basilica is the biggest Roman Catholic Church in the United States. Its Upper Church seats 3,000, and the Lower Church seats 300. It also has the world’s vastest collection of contemporary ecclesiastical art. There are several hour-long tours available each day (except during noon mass).

The Catholic University of America (CUA)

620 Michigan Ave NE

The national university of the Catholic Church is consequently located next to the National Shrine. CUA is “dedicated to advancing the dialogue between faith and reason.” Its 193-acre campus feels more like a quiet suburb than one of DC’s lively neighborhoods. Self-guided walking tours are available at the Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center information desk.

President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home

140 Rock Creek Church Rd NW

This formerly rural place is where President Abraham Lincoln spent a quarter of his presidency. The visitor experience focuses Lincoln’s psyche, as the place was his quiet, moral retreat. Before Lincoln resided here, the building was a home for retired and disabled veterans and the campus on which the cottage stands remains a military community. A $15 million grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation helped preserve the place in 2008.

US Capitol Building

East Capitol St NE & First St SE, Washington, DC 20004

The Capitol is one of the most architecturally impressive and symbolically important buildings in the world. The Senate and the House of Representatives have met here for more than two centuries. It has been built, burnt, rebuilt, extended, and restored. The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center is the newest addition to this historic complex and is approximately three quarters the size of the Capitol itself. The entire facility is located underground on the east side of the Capitol so as not to detract from the appearance of the Capitol and the grounds.

US Botanical Gardens

100 Maryland Ave SW, Washington, DC 20024

The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a living plant museum. It teaches visitors about the importance and value of plants to the well-being of humans and to earth’s fragile ecosystems. George Washington’s vision for the US capital city included a botanic garden that would demonstrate and promote the importance of plants to the nation. It was established by the U.S. Congress in 1820 and is now one of the oldest botanic gardens in North America. Since 1934, it has been administered through the Architect of the Capitol. The Garden has been recognized as a museum and is accredited by the American Association of Museums, which recognizes a museum’s commitment to excellence, accountability, high professional standards and continued institutional improvement.

Library of Congress

101 Independence Ave SE, Washington, DC 20540

The Library of Congress was established by an act of Congress in 1800. President John Adams signed a bill providing for the transfer of the seat of government from Philadelphia to Washington, and the legislation described a reference library for Congress only. It should contain “such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress – and for putting up a suitable apartment for containing them therein…” When the Library of Congress building opened its doors to the public on November 1, 1897, it was hailed “the largest, the costliest, and the safest” library building in the world. The library is an unparalleled world resource with a collection of more than 158 million items with cataloged books and other print materials in 460 languages. It is also home to the largest rare book collection in North America, and the world’s largest collection of legal materials, films, maps, sheet music and sound recordings.

Folger Shakespeare Library

201 East Capitol St SE, Washington, DC 20003

This library is one of the largest and finest collection of Shakespeare materials. It is also home to major collections of other rare Renaissance books, manuscripts, and works of art. The Folger opened in 1932 as a gift to the American nation from Henry Clay Folger and his wife Emily Jordan Folger. Today the library serves a wide audience of researchers, visitors, teachers, students, families, and theater- and concert-goers. Its conservation lab is a leading innovator in the preservation of rare materials. In addition, the library hosts public programs such as plays, concerts, literary readings, and activities for families and schools. The library is administered by a Board of Governors under the auspices of Amherst College, Henry Folger’s alma mater.

Eastern Market

225 7th St SE, Washington, DC 20003

Eastern Market is DC’s destination for fresh food, community events, and local produce and handmade arts and crafts on the weekend. For over 136 years, Eastern Market has served as a community hub for all people. The South Hall Market is where merchants serve the finest meats, poultry, seafood, produce, pasta, baked goods and cheeses from all over the world. Outside of the market, area farmers bring produce direct from farms in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. Beyond fruits, veggies, and fresh flowers, over 100 exhibitors of handmade arts, crafts, jewelry, and antiques offer something for everyone!

Kreeger Museum

2401 Foxhall Rd NW

Little known even to locals is this private house-museum with an impressive collection of paintings by the impressionist and early modern masters. The house itself is a work of art, designed by modernist architects Philip Johnson andRichard Foster. The ride out to the museum will take you through some of the country’s wealthiest neighborhoods.

Hillwood Estate

4155 Linnean Avenue NW

Hillwood Estate is a hidden gem of magnificent proportions. Merriweather Post Hillwood, a prominent businesswoman and heiress to the Post Cereal fortune, built her home next to Rock Creek Park. The estate was to be an extraordinarily stately and luxurious site for entertaining guests, housing for her impressive art collections, and was built with the intention of leaving it behind for the world to enjoy. The mansion contains many French and Russian decorative arts, much of which she obtained from the USSR, whose government at the time under Stalin was then auctioning off a good portion of its cultural heritage to finance its war efforts. Second in grandeur only to the art collection itself are the French and Japanese-style gardens.

National Cathedral (Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul)

3001 Wisconsin Ave NW

A Gothic mammoth and the world’s sixth largest cathedral, the National Cathedral is a huge attraction that draws in many visitors. Cut over a period of 83 years, the cathedral is made up of 150,000 tons of stone. Tours are a must if you really want to see the cathedral, as towers and the crypt are off limits without a guide during the busy season. The organ demonstrations are also spectacular. Check the website for events, as there is often children’s programming as well as major concerts.

Ford’s Theatre

511 10th St NW

April 14, 1865 – President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth during a performance of Our American Cousin. For 100 years, the theatre remained closed, tainted by the dismal event, however in 1968 the Ford’s Theatre was restored to its former glory.

The theater is now a beautiful, fully operating arts and education venue, managed by the National Parks Service. Rangers lead tours of the museum, which explores Lincoln’s presidency from inauguration to assassination through a series of artifacts. A great place to explore, the Center for Leadership and Education resides across from the theater and adjacent to the Petersen House where Lincoln died. There are three galleries, including one about the aftermath following Lincoln’s assassination, and a 34-foot tower of books written about the president.

Newseum 

555 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Forget a civics textbook – all you need is a trip to this 643,000 square foot museum to obtain a thorough understanding of events that have shaped the world since the printing press was invented. The Newseum helps visitors realize the power and importance of a free press, the museum’s ultimate mission. The building features a prime view of the U.S. Capitol as well as graffiti’d sections of the Berlin Wall, a collection of heart-wrenching newspaper front pages after September 11, and Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs. You can test your on-camera skills in the NBC News interactive newsroom, where you can be recorded in a TV reporter role-play via green screen. The museum continually documents media’s evolution through exhibits like the HP New Media Gallery which demonstrates how significant news events were reported in recent years through mediums like Twitter.

National Gallery of Art

6th and Constitution Ave NW

The official national art collection of the U.S. begun by financier Andrew W. Mellon contains permanent European painting collections going back to the 14th century, including the only Leonardo da Vinci painting in the Americas, Italian cabinet galleries and French Rococo pieces, well-known Impressionist paintings and other impressive sculptures, prints and photographs that fill the classical style West Building and H-shaped, I.M. Pei-designed East Building. In the summer, catch the museum’s popular Jazz in the Sculpture Garden series on Friday evenings.

The Shakespeare Theatre Company

610 F St NW

Here, the mission of the nation’s foremost Shakespeare company is to present classic theatre in an accessible way. This is why you can find so many fabulous prix-fixe menus nearby. The  theater is often a contender at the local Helen Hayes Awards each year and was awarded the 2012 Tony Award for regional theater and offers lavish, frequent and sometimes free productions.

Verizon Center

601 F St NW

This 20,000 seat arena is home to most D.C. sports teams, like the Washington Wizards, Washington Capitals, Washington Mystics and the Georgetown Hoyas. There are 220 events a year here, so chances are you’ll always be able to snag tickets to a great function, whether it’s Beyonce, a monster truck show or an audience with the Dalai Lama.

National Zoological Park

3001 Connecticut Ave NW

Unlike many around the nation, entrance to the National Zoo is free. The zoo itself is a short walk from Cleveland park, but should you drive, arrive early for a limited spot in the zoo’s parking lot or enter on Connecticut Avenue. Visit the giant panda and elephant exhibits first, which tend to get crowded. The pandas are symbolic diplomatic gifts to the U.S. from China and recently welcomed a new baby panda to the world named Bao Bao. Plenty of food and drink concessions are available, but visitors are welcome to bring their own picnic. Lay it out on a grassy area by the Big Cats Exhibit, where you may hear roars, or on a table by the Think Tank, where you can observe orangutans while you eat. Hundreds of conservation volunteers stand by all year to help you learn and enjoy the 163-acre, 400-species park.

Rock Creek Park

Throughout Woodley Park and Cleveland Park

Rock Creek Park spans 1,752 acres from Georgetown up into Maryland. With 30 picnic areas, hiking trails and paved bicycle paths along memorials, wooden areas and streams, there’s always something to do here. There is also a summer concert venue in the woods (Carter Barron Amphitheater), a world-class tennis facility (William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Stadium), Rock Creek Golf Course, a horse barn and the Rock Creek Nature Center (complete with planetarium!). Evening star gazing sessions with the National Capital Astronomers run during the summer and fall, and there are regular astronomy shows for children on weekends.

The Uptown Theatre 

3426 Connecticut Ave NW

The single, concave screen in this movie theatre, which opened in 1936, is about 2,800 square feet and one of the biggest in the area. The theater is located near the Cleveland Park metro and across from a strip of local eateries. On opening nights for new blockbusters, expect lines out the door and possibly down the street. Once inside, grab a plush red seat on the mezzanine so you can comfortably watch the action without kinking your neck.

Gala Hispanic Theater 

3333 14th St NW

The Gala has been making rich Hispanic traditions accessible to the public through performing arts for nearly four decades. While known for classical performances by its in-house company and visiting international artists, the theatre also features kid-specific programming throughout the year. The Tivoli Theatre, built in 1924 as one of the grandest movie theaters at the time, was restored and became the Gala’s home in 2005. Make an appointment to view rotating art exhibits in the historic building during performance seasons and check out the Italian Renaissance style dome over the main stage.

Capital Bike Share

Across Washington, D.C.

There are several bikeshare locations within a few blocks of the Columbia Heights metro station for easy access to major landmarks around town. To rent one, which you can dock and return to any station in the city, simply purchase a membership, which costs $7 for 24 hours; $15 for three days, and then rent by the hour. The most peaceful place to launch your two-wheeled tour is at Holmstead Place across from Heller’s Bakery and away from the neighborhood’s hustle and bustle. Head northwest to the edge of Rock Creek Park, south to Meridian Hill Park and around Howard University, or east for a quiet ride along neighborhood streets.

Mexican Cultural Institute 

2829 16th St NW

This educational institution pays homage to the traditions and heritage of our southern neighbor, with artistic flair to match. Pay special attention to the three story, colorful mural by Mexican artist Roberto Cueva del Rio, which winds up the original grand staircase of this stately mansion built in 1912. Formerly the official guesthouse for visiting dignitaries and Mexican embassy, the Italian-style mansion is now an educational center with historical exhibits, concerts and talks. Free guided tours are available anytime for individuals, who must ring the doorbell to enter the building, but groups should call for reservations. Don’t miss highly coveted, quarterly Mexican Table events with chef and PBS personality Pati Jinich for a chance to munch on authentic cuisine in the 100-seat mansion dining room, which features intricate, gold ceiling moldings and a stunning mosaic tile annex.

Meridian Hill Park

2400 15th St NW

Call this place fitness central. You’ll likely catch joggers, dog walkers and trainers drilling clients in the mornings and early evenings, but tossing frisbees on the lawn or sitting with a book can be an equally introspective within the park’s stone enclosure. Walk a couple of blocks south from the Mexican Cultural Institute to enter on 16th Street, and make your way past park benches to the south end. Cyclists and hikers often rest at this overlook of cascading water, ponds and greenery behind Howard University. Walk down the steps and through the garden for a breathtaking view of the cascade from the farthest pool.

Heurich House Museum

1307 New Hampshire Ave., NW

The Heurich House Museum remains one of the most intact Victorian houses in the country, and a Landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. Built of poured concrete and reinforced steel by a German immigrant and local brewer and Christian Heurich, a philanthropist, between 1892-1894, it is also the city’s first fireproof home. Heurich was Washington’s second largest landowner and the largest private employer in the nation’s capital. As the world’s oldest brewer, he ran the Christian Heurich Brewing Company until his death at 102-years-old. A visit to the “Brewmaster’s Castle” will send you back to the late-19th century — a time when the Heurich family resided in Washington’s premiere residential neighborhood, Dupont Circle.

Phillips Collection

1600 21st Street, NW

The Phillips Collection is an exceptional collection of modern and contemporary art. The artwork is set in a dynamic environment for collaboration, innovation, engagement with the world, scholarship, and new forms of public participation. Visit to encounter superb works of modern art in an intimate setting. The Phillips Collection first opened to the public in 1921 and houses paintings by Renoir and Rothko, Bonnard and O’Keeffe, van Gogh and Diebenkorn, as well as many other stunning impressionist and modern artists. Its distinctive building combines extensive new galleries with the former home of its founder, Duncan Phillips. The collection continues to develop with selective new acquisitions, many by contemporary artists.

Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle

NE Corner of 15th and H Streets, NW

The St. Matthew the Apostle was the fourth parish established in the District of Columbia. It was dedicated on November 1, 1840 and served its parishioners through the 1890s. In 1892, its then-pastor, Monsignor Thomas Sim Lee, purchased the land on which the current church structure is located on Rhode Island Avenue, NW. He commissioned the architect Christopher Grant LaFarge to work on the design of the new church structure. The cornerstone was laid and blessed in 1893 and the first Mass celebrated in 1895. Construction continued in various stages with the dome put in place in 1913. In 1947, Pope Pius XII separated Washington from Baltimore and made Washington an independent Archdiocese. At the same time, St. Matthew’s was named the Cathedral and Mother Church of the new archdiocese. In 1974, the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On November 25,1963, the funeral of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy was celebrated in the Cathedral and is memorialized by a marble plaque imposed in the floor immediately before the gates of the sanctuary commemorating the place where his casket was placed for the funeral Mass and rites.

Mansion on O Street

2016 O St. NW, Washington, DC, 20036

The only museum of its kind, O Street Museum Foundation has always been dedicated to exploring the creative process. The collection rotates and changes daily, allowing you to witness new art, music and surroundings; no visit is ever the same. From artist’s letters, to animation stills, to written manuscripts, to one of the largest “raw and exposed” music collections, the galleries at the Mansion on O Street are not limited to one genre. Check out an immersive, tactile experience where you will hear rare studio cuts, leaf through manuscripts, touch sculpture and tour through a multitude of architectural styles. In addition, there are a wide range of programs including artist-in-residence, live concerts, art-leasing, songwriter’s workshop and kids programs to see.

John F. Kennedy Center for the Arts

2700 F St NW

A living cultural memorial to our 35th president, this arts venue hosts ballet, music, theatre, jazz and music performances on a regular basis, including those of the National Symphony Orchestra and the Washington National Opera. If you can’t make it to a show, free hour-long guided tours of the Hall of States, Hall of Nations, theaters and art displays are available every 10 minutes. Try to make the 4:30 p.m. tour. It is followed by a free daily performance on the Millennium Stage at 6 p.m. Then take the elevator to the Kennedy Center’s Roof Terrace Restaurant for a sunset views of the Potomac River. Though it’s a 10 minute walk from the Foggy Bottom Metro Station, a complimentary Kennedy Center shuttle is available at the Metro Station exit.

The House of Sweden 

2900 K St NW

The House of Sweden, which houses the embassies of Sweden and Iceland, joins several other international organizations nearby like the International Monetary Fund, Department of State and the World Bank. The building’s minimalist, glass exterior symbolizes transparency and democracy, but has also won Sweden’s prestigious Kasper Salin Architecture Award. Rotating exhibitions include art displays, readings and short plays, but with panoramic views of the river, Kennedy Center, Air Force Memorial and Watergate.

The Watergate Complex

700 New Hampshire Ave NW

This is where a scandalous break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters eventually forced President Richard M. Nixon to resign. The building’s curvy designs, by famed Italian architect Luigi Moretti, make up a six-building complex that includes a hotel, apartments and offices. When completed in 1971, it was an experiment in urban planning – a “city within a city.

US Department of Interior Museum

1849 C Street NW

The Department of Interior wants you to know how it manages and sustains America’s lands, wildlife and energy resources. To meet this objective, 1,500 handicrafts and artifacts from insular U.S. territories are available for viewing at the Interior Museum. Reservations are required for a free, hour-long murals tour in the C Street lobby. You’ll learn about the art and architecture that made this building a “symbol of a new day” during the Great Depression, with works by Ansel Adams, Maynard Dixon and Allan House.

Old Stone House

3051 M Street, NW

This unassuming building commemorates the daily lives of ordinary Americans who made this city, and this nation, unique. The Old Stone House, one of the oldest known structures remaining in the nation’s capital, is a simple 18th century dwelling built and inhabited by common people. It is the last Pre-Revolutionary (Colonial) building standing in Washington, DC on it’s original foundation. The 1st owner was Christopher Layman, his wife Rachel, and two sons. The 2nd owner was Cassandra Chew. She bought the property in 1767 and added on a kitchen and upper level to the home. The home remained in the family from 1767 to 1875.The “Layman home” was converted into a merchants shop and the home served as both a residence and a place of business. The house is furnished to reflect upper-middle class living during the late 1700’s. The only furnishing which has a connection to the home is the grandfather clock located in the dining room. It is believed that the clock was made in the merchant’s shop during the early 1800’s.

Dumbarton House

2715 Q Street, NW

Dumbarton House offers guests a unique opportunity to view one of the finest examples of Federal period architecture in the U.S., along with its impressive furniture and decorative arts collections. They take away a clear idea of what life was like in the earliest days of our nation’s capital. The mission of Dumbarton House, headquarters of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, is to support the organization’s Corporate Societies and their members, to maintain its historic museum property, and to enhance the cultural life of Washington, D.C. Through the interpretation of its historic site and collections, Dumbarton House promotes the understanding of historic preservation and of the early history of our nation, so that the lives and ideals of early Americans inspire present and future generations.

Georgetown University

37th and O Streets, NW

Georgetown University is one of the world’s leading academic and research institutions, offering a unique educational experience that prepares the next generation of global citizens to lead and make a difference in the world. Georgetown University is a vibrant community of exceptional students, faculty, alumni and professionals dedicated to real-world applications of our research, scholarship, faith and service. Established in 1789, Georgetown is the nation’s oldest Catholic and Jesuit university. Drawing upon its legacy, they provide students with a world-class learning experience focused on educating the whole person through exposure to different faiths, cultures and beliefs. With its Jesuit values and location in Washington, D.C., Georgetown offers students a distinct opportunity to learn, experience and understand more about the world.

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

Established in 1751, Georgetown flourished as a tobacco port until the middle of the 19th century. Because of natural obstructions to transportation further up the Potomac River, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal began in Georgetown its 184.5-mile journey to the reaches of Western Maryland. In the 19th and early 20th century the C&O Canal provided jobs and opportunities for people throughout the Potomac River Valley, from the tidal basin in Washington D.C. to the mountains of Western Maryland. In a little less than one hundred years, the C&O Canal witnessed a race west by transportation giants, the growth and decline of communities and businesses along the banks of the Potomac River, fierce battles raging between a divided nation, and improvements in technology that made life along the canal obsolete. Today the remains of the C&O Canal provide a place to recreate and enjoy nature, but most importantly they tell the story of the canal’s important role in America’s history. Stories of western expansion, transportation, engineering, the Civil War, immigration, industry and commerce.

House of Sweden

House of Sweden in Washington D.C. houses the Embassy of Sweden, the Embassy of Iceland and office suites as well as an Event Center that features conference and exhibition halls. Situated on the Potomac River, House of Sweden has become the perfect place to meet and work in the heart of Georgetown. In 2006, House of Sweden – a stunning example of contemporary Scandinavian architecture designed by Gert Wingårdh and Tomas Hansen – was inaugurated as the new home of the Embassy of Sweden in Washington D.C. As a physical representation of Swedish values such as openness, transparency and democracy, House of Sweden is the flagship of Swedish public diplomacy in the United States.

Old Stone House

3051 M Street, NW

This unassuming building commemorates the daily lives of ordinary Americans who made this city, and this nation, unique. The Old Stone House, one of the oldest known structures remaining in the nation’s capital, is a simple 18th century dwelling built and inhabited by common people. It is the last Pre-Revolutionary (Colonial) building standing in Washington, DC on it’s original foundation. The 1st owner was Christopher Layman, his wife Rachel, and two sons. The 2nd owner was Cassandra Chew. She bought the property in 1767 and added on a kitchen and upper level to the home. The home remained in the family from 1767 to 1875.The “Layman home” was converted into a merchants shop and the home served as both a residence and a place of business. The house is furnished to reflect upper-middle class living during the late 1700’s. The only furnishing which has a connection to the home is the grandfather clock located in the dining room. It is believed that the clock was made in the merchant’s shop during the early 1800’s.

Dumbarton House

2715 Q Street, NW

Dumbarton House offers guests a unique opportunity to view one of the finest examples of Federal period architecture in the U.S., along with its impressive furniture and decorative arts collections. They take away a clear idea of what life was like in the earliest days of our nation’s capital. The mission of Dumbarton House, headquarters of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, is to support the organization’s Corporate Societies and their members, to maintain its historic museum property, and to enhance the cultural life of Washington, D.C. Through the interpretation of its historic site and collections, Dumbarton House promotes the understanding of historic preservation and of the early history of our nation, so that the lives and ideals of early Americans inspire present and future generations.

Georgetown University

37th and O Streets, NW

Georgetown University is one of the world’s leading academic and research institutions, offering a unique educational experience that prepares the next generation of global citizens to lead and make a difference in the world. Georgetown University is a vibrant community of exceptional students, faculty, alumni and professionals dedicated to real-world applications of our research, scholarship, faith and service. Established in 1789, Georgetown is the nation’s oldest Catholic and Jesuit university. Drawing upon its legacy, they provide students with a world-class learning experience focused on educating the whole person through exposure to different faiths, cultures and beliefs. With its Jesuit values and location in Washington, D.C., Georgetown offers students a distinct opportunity to learn, experience and understand more about the world.

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

Established in 1751, Georgetown flourished as a tobacco port until the middle of the 19th century. Because of natural obstructions to transportation further up the Potomac River, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal began in Georgetown its 184.5-mile journey to the reaches of Western Maryland. In the 19th and early 20th century the C&O Canal provided jobs and opportunities for people throughout the Potomac River Valley, from the tidal basin in Washington D.C. to the mountains of Western Maryland. In a little less than one hundred years, the C&O Canal witnessed a race west by transportation giants, the growth and decline of communities and businesses along the banks of the Potomac River, fierce battles raging between a divided nation, and improvements in technology that made life along the canal obsolete. Today the remains of the C&O Canal provide a place to recreate and enjoy nature, but most importantly they tell the story of the canal’s important role in America’s history. Stories of western expansion, transportation, engineering, the Civil War, immigration, industry and commerce.

House of Sweden

House of Sweden in Washington D.C. houses the Embassy of Sweden, the Embassy of Iceland and office suites as well as an Event Center that features conference and exhibition halls. Situated on the Potomac River, House of Sweden has become the perfect place to meet and work in the heart of Georgetown. In 2006, House of Sweden – a stunning example of contemporary Scandinavian architecture designed by Gert Wingårdh and Tomas Hansen – was inaugurated as the new home of the Embassy of Sweden in Washington D.C. As a physical representation of Swedish values such as openness, transparency and democracy, House of Sweden is the flagship of Swedish public diplomacy in the United States.

ome” was converted into a merchants shop and the home served as both a residence and a place of business. The house is furnished to reflect upper-middle class living during the late 1700’s. The only furnishing which has a connection to the home is the grandfather clock located in the dining room. It is believed that the clock was made in the merchant’s shop during the early 1800’s.

Dumbarton House

Located at 2715 Q Street, NW, Dumbarton House offers guests a unique opportunity to view one of the finest examples of Federal period architecture in the U.S., along with its impressive furniture and decorative arts collections. They take away a clear idea of what life was like in the earliest days of our nation’s capital. The mission of Dumbarton House, headquarters of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, is to support the organization’s Corporate Societies and their members, to maintain its historic museum property, and to enhance the cultural life of Washington, D.C. Through the interpretation of its historic site and collections, Dumbarton House promotes the understanding of historic preservation and of the early history of our nation, so that the lives and ideals of early Americans inspire present and future generations.

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

Established in 1751, Georgetown flourished as a tobacco port until the middle of the 19th century. Because of natural obstructions to transportation further up the Potomac River, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal began in Georgetown its 184.5-mile journey to the reaches of Western Maryland. In the 19th and early 20th century the C&O Canal provided jobs and opportunities for people throughout the Potomac River Valley, from the tidal basin in Washington D.C. to the mountains of Western Maryland. In a little less than one hundred years, the C&O Canal witnessed a race west by transportation giants, the growth and decline of communities and businesses along the banks of the Potomac River, fierce battles raging between a divided nation, and improvements in technology that made life along the canal obsolete. Today the remains of the C&O Canal provide a place to recreate and enjoy nature, but most importantly they tell the story of the canal’s important role in America’s history. Stories of western expansion, transportation, engineering, the Civil War, immigration, industry and commerce.

House of Sweden

House of Sweden in Washington D.C. houses the Embassy of Sweden, the Embassy of Iceland and office suites as well as an Event Center that features conference and exhibition halls. Situated on the Potomac River, House of Sweden has become the perfect place to meet and work in the heart of Georgetown. In 2006, House of Sweden – a stunning example of contemporary Scandinavian architecture designed by Gert Wingårdh and Tomas Hansen – was inaugurated as the new home of the Embassy of Sweden in Washington D.C. As a physical representation of Swedish values such as openness, transparency and democracy, House of Sweden is the flagship of Swedish public diplomacy in the United States.

Heurich House Museum

1307 New Hampshire Ave., NW

The Heurich House Museum is one of the most intact Victorian houses in the country, and a Landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1892-4 of poured concrete and reinforced steel by German immigrant, local brewer, and philanthropist Christian Heurich (Hi-Rick), it is also the city’s first fireproof home. Heurich was Washington’s second largest landowner and the largest private employer in the nation’s capital. As the world’s oldest brewer, he ran the Christian Heurich Brewing Company until his death at 102. A visit to the “Brewmaster’s Castle” is a visit back in time to the late-19th century, when the Heurich family was in residence in Washington’s premiere residential neighborhood, Dupont Circle.

Phillips Collection

1600 21st Street, NW

The Phillips Collection is an exceptional collection of modern and contemporary art in a dynamic environment for collaboration, innovation, engagement with the world, scholarship, and new forms of public participation. Encounter superb works of modern art in an intimate setting at The Phillips Collection, opened to the public in 1921 in Washington’s vibrant Dupont Circle neighborhood. Paintings by Renoir and Rothko, Bonnard and O’Keeffe, van Gogh and Diebenkorn are among the many stunning impressionist and modern works that fill the museum. Its distinctive building combines extensive new galleries with the former home of its founder, Duncan Phillips. The collection continues to develop with selective new acquisitions, many by contemporary artists.

Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle

1725 Rhode Island Ave NW

This cathedral was dedicated on November 1, 1840 and served its parishioners through the 1890s. In 1892, its then-pastor, Monsignor Thomas Sim Lee, purchased the land on which the current church structure is located on Rhode Island Avenue, NW. He commissioned the architect Christopher Grant LaFarge to work on the design of the new church structure. The cornerstone was laid and blessed in 1893 and the first Mass celebrated in 1895. Construction continued in various stages with the dome put in place in 1913. In 1947, Pope Pius XII separated Washington from Baltimore and made Washington an independent Archdiocese. At the same time, St. Matthew’s was named the Cathedral and Mother Church of the new archdiocese. In 1974, the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On November 25,1963, the funeral of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy was celebrated in the Cathedral and is memorialized by a marble plaque imposed in the floor immediately before the gates of the sanctuary commemorating the place where his casket was placed for the funeral Mass and rites.

Mansion on O Street

The only museum of its kind, O Street Museum Foundation has always been dedicated to exploring the creative process. The collection rotates and changes daily. From the art, to the music, to the surroundings, no visit is ever the same. From artist’s letters, to animation stills, to written manuscripts, to one of the largest “raw and exposed” music collections, our galleries are not limited to one genre. O Street Museum offers an immersive, tactile experience where you will hear rare studio cuts, leaf through manuscripts, touch sculpture and tour through a multitude of architectural styles. The O Street Museum also offers a wide range of programs including artist-in-residence, live concerts, art-leasing, songwriter’s workshop and kids programs.

Yoga District

1830 1st St NW

Yoga District, the highest-rated DC yoga studio on yelp.com for over a year, offers affordable and by-donation yoga classes in community-run yoga centers committed to eco-friendly practices. Why not join the studio? The studio’s laid back community of diverse students and dedicated teachers are exploring yoga for fun, health, peace, and a variety of other reasons. Its teachers are trained in a wide range of unique yoga traditions.

Rustik Tavern

84 T St NW, Washington, DC 20001

With overwhelming neighborhood support and much excitement, Rustik Tavern opened their doors on September 24th, 2010. Since then, the place has enjoyed becoming acquainted with all the neighborhood faces and provides a spot for people to convene, watch the game and have a good time with friends and family.

The Red Hen

1822 1st St NW, Washington, DC 20002

An Italian-influenced American restaurant located in the historic Bloomingdale neighborhood of Washington, DC. Proprietors and long-time friends Michael Friedman, Michael O’Malley and Sebastian Zutant have introduced a youthful sophistication to the rapidly evolving dining scene in one of the most eclectic neighborhoods in the nation’s capital.

Big Bear Cafe

1700 1st St NW, Washington, DC 20001

This Bloomingdale and Le Droit Park staple has been very popular in recent years.  Ingredients are sourced from local farms, dairy producers, and vendors – with focus on the vendors from our very own Bloomingdale Farmers’ Market that opens every Sunday from 9am to 1pm (May through November).

Logan Circle Park, Statue and Fountain

1 Logan Circle

Historical figures, such as civil rights activist Mary McLeod Bethune, strolled Logan Circle and its park and admired the three- to five-story Victorian and Romanesque Revival row houses you can still see today. In fact, Bethune’s former home was right on Vermont Avenue.

A large 1888 mansion-turned-condo building at 1 Logan Circle at the southwest corner is one of the circle’s main features. When visiting Local Circle, make like a local and enjoy reading or people-watching in the park in the circle’s center. It’s hard to believe this is where Civil War deserters were hanged, but the statue of John A. Logan, Tennessee’s Army commander during the Civil War, pays homage to the country’s storied past.

Studio Theater

1501 14th Street, NW

The Studio Theatre is dedicated to producing the best in contemporary theatre. Their restless, innovative spirit generates an uncommonly rich and diverse body of work, encompassing provocative new writing from around the world, unique special events, and inventive stagings of contemporary classics. They strive to present audiences with extraordinary writing, sophisticated design, and stunning performance.

Their commitment to connecting actors and audience is built into the very architecture of the building, where none of the four performance spaces seat more than 225 patrons. No theatre of comparable budget size operates such exclusively intimate spaces.

The Studio Theatre is also committed to nurturing future generations of theatre professionals by offering rigorous theatre training for both adults and young people, providing year-long apprenticeships for early-career arts leaders, and involving emerging talent in the creation of our work.

Mary McLeod Bethune Council House

1218 Vermont Ave., NW

Mary McLeod Bethune achieved her greatest recognition at the Washington, DC townhouse that is now this National Historic Site. The Council House was the first headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and was Bethune’s last home in Washington, DC. From there, Bethune and the NCNW spearheaded strategies and developed programs that advanced the interests of African American women. The Council House has been modified over the years and even restored from damage after a fire. The floor plan is unchanged but the furnishings are incomplete. The National Park Service recreated the feel of the Council House during Mrs. Bethune’s residence through historic photographs and what furniture remains.

Washington Improv Theater

1835 14th St NW

The Washington Improv Theater (WIT) has been exploring what incredible things can happen without a script for over a decade. The three aspects of WIT are shows, classes, and community. WIT shows reach over 10,000 audience members each year with their spontaneous blend of playfulness, comedy and drama.

The contents of every performance are unpredictable, but the impact is not. In addition to its regular performances at Source, Flashpoint and on other stages in Washington, WIT ensembles are invited regularly to perform at the nation’s most respected improv festivals, including the Chicago Improv Festival, the Del Close Marathon, and the North Carolina Arts Festival.

WIT is more than just a performing theater as its mission prioritizes outreach and education. They believe that improv increases awareness, skills, and confidence in almost anyone who does it. They’re as dedicated to what goes on its classroom as it is to what happens on its stage.

Gala Hispanic Theater 

3333 14th St NW

The Gala has been making rich Hispanic traditions accessible to the public through performing arts for nearly four decades. While known for classical performances by its in-house company and visiting international artists, the theatre also features kid-specific programming throughout the year. The Tivoli Theatre, built in 1924 as one of the grandest movie theaters at the time, was restored and became the Gala’s home in 2005. There are also rotating art exhibits in the historic building during performance season.

Capital Bike Share

Across Washington, D.C.

There are several bikeshare locations within a few blocks of the Columbia Heights metro station for easy access to major landmarks around town. To rent one, which you can dock and return to any station in the city, simply purchase a membership, which costs $7 for 24 hours; $15 for three days, and then rent by the hour. The most peaceful place to launch your two-wheeled tour is at Holmstead Place across from Heller’s Bakery and away from the neighborhood’s hustle and bustle. Head northwest to the edge of Rock Creek Park, south to Meridian Hill Park and around Howard University, or east for a quiet ride along neighborhood streets.

Mexican Cultural Institute 

2829 16th St NW

This educational institution pays homage to the traditions and heritage of our southern neighbor, with artistic flair to match. Pay special attention to the three story, colorful mural by Mexican artist Roberto Cueva del Rio, which winds up the original grand staircase of this stately mansion built in 1912. Formerly the official guesthouse for visiting dignitaries and Mexican embassy, the Italian-style mansion is now an educational center with historical exhibits, concerts and talks. Free guided tours are available anytime for individuals, who must ring the doorbell to enter the building, but groups should call for reservations. Don’t miss highly coveted, quarterly Mexican Table events with chef and PBS personality Pati Jinich for a chance to munch on authentic cuisine in the 100-seat mansion dining room, which features intricate, gold ceiling moldings and a stunning mosaic tile annex.

Meridian Hill Park

2400 15th St NW

This is a fantastic location to spy dog walkers and trainers drilling clients in the mornings and early evenings, or residents tossing frisbees on the lawn and reading within the park’s stone enclosure. Cyclists and hikers often rest at this overlook of cascading water, ponds and greenery behind Howard University.

Arena Stage

SW Maine Ave & SW 7th St

Arena Stage was one of the nation’s original resident theaters when it was founded in 1950. While it specializes in producing American classics, the venerable theatre company also premieres new works by emerging artists. The theatre raised $125 million and took a decade from conception through construction to complete. With three stages from 200 to 700 seats each, there isn’t a bad seat in the house.

Spirit of Washington

600 Water St SW

The Spirit of Washington cruises by the Washington Monument and Fort McNair, down the Potomac past Old Town Alexandria and the Jones Point Lighthouse and back. Passengers can enjoy a grand buffet, dancing and live music. Holiday, full moon, gospel lunch, cherry blossom and other themed cruises are also available. Slacks, dresses and button downs are recommended during dinner, but casual dress is fine for lunch.

East Potomac Park Golf Course

972 Ohio Dr SW

Located on the banks of the Potomac River, this golf course with two 18-hole options is basic but hassle-free. Where else can you line up your shot with the Washington Monument?

Union Station

50 Massachusetts Ave NE

From the outside, Union Station may look like many old federal buildings in downtown Washington, but its $160 million revamp in 1988 was the largest public/private restoration project ever completed in the U.S. Metro, Amtrak, VRE and MARC trains come to and from Union Station headed to Virginia, Maryland and beyond. Shops and restaurants like B.Smith’s, a Baroque dining room in the former suite where U.S. presidents used to board trains, make up the interior shopping space of Union Station.

Kellogg Conference Hotel at Gallaudet

800 Florida Ave NE

Gallaudet, founded in 1864, is world’s only university specifically designed to accommodate deaf and hard of hearing students. The hotel on its historic campus opened in 1995 with the premise of barrier-free communication and open idea exchange. With ample parking for a large group (a hard-to-come-by amenity in Washington), plus comfortable, accessible and technologically advanced meeting rooms, this is a great place to meet for a quiet business retreat with close access to downtown. Tours of the university are also available.

National Postal Museum

2 Massachusetts Avenue Northeast

The National Postal Museum in the old Post Office building next to Union Station contains many artifiacts and a rich history of American stamps. The answers to burning questions like how mail winds up on your doorstep so fast (we’ve come a long way since horse drawn carriages), and how many types of postage stamps have been in circulation since the USPS’ inception in 1639, can be found here through a series of exhibits and tours.

Old Stone House

Located at 3051 M Street, NW in the midst of Washington, D.C., a city of grand memorials to national leaders and significant events, stands an unassuming building commemorating the daily lives of ordinary Americans who made this city, and this nation, unique. The Old Stone House, one of the oldest known structures remaining in the nation’s capital, is a simple 18th century dwelling built and inhabited by common people. It is the last Pre-Revolutionary (Colonial) building standing in Washington, DC on it’s original foundation. The 1st owner was Christopher Layman, his wife Rachel, and two sons. The 2nd owner was Cassandra Chew. She bought the property in 1767 and added on a kitchen and upper level to the home. The home remained in the family from 1767 to 1875.The “Layman home” was converted into a merchants shop and the home served as both a residence and a place of business. The house is furnished to reflect upper-middle class living during the late 1700’s. The only furnishing which has a connection to the home is the grandfather clock located in the dining room. It is believed that the clock was made in the merchant’s shop during the early 1800’s.

Dumbarton House

Located at 2715 Q Street, NW, Dumbarton House offers guests a unique opportunity to view one of the finest examples of Federal period architecture in the U.S., along with its impressive furniture and decorative arts collections. They take away a clear idea of what life was like in the earliest days of our nation’s capital. The mission of Dumbarton House, headquarters of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, is to support the organization’s Corporate Societies and their members, to maintain its historic museum property, and to enhance the cultural life of Washington, D.C. Through the interpretation of its historic site and collections, Dumbarton House promotes the understanding of historic preservation and of the early history of our nation, so that the lives and ideals of early Americans inspire present and future generations.

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

Established in 1751, Georgetown flourished as a tobacco port until the middle of the 19th century. Because of natural obstructions to transportation further up the Potomac River, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal began in Georgetown its 184.5-mile journey to the reaches of Western Maryland. In the 19th and early 20th century the C&O Canal provided jobs and opportunities for people throughout the Potomac River Valley, from the tidal basin in Washington D.C. to the mountains of Western Maryland. In a little less than one hundred years, the C&O Canal witnessed a race west by transportation giants, the growth and decline of communities and businesses along the banks of the Potomac River, fierce battles raging between a divided nation, and improvements in technology that made life along the canal obsolete. Today the remains of the C&O Canal provide a place to recreate and enjoy nature, but most importantly they tell the story of the canal’s important role in America’s history. Stories of western expansion, transportation, engineering, the Civil War, immigration, industry and commerce.

Kreeger Museum

2401 Foxhall Rd NW

This private house-museum is home to an impressive collection of paintings by impressionist and early modern masters. The house itself is a work of art, designed by modernist architects Philip Johnson andRichard Foster.

Hillwood Estate

4155 Linnean Avenue NW

Merriweather Post Hillwood, a prominent businesswoman and heiress to the Post Cereal fortune, fashioned her estate next to Rock Creek Park. She intended it to be a stately and luxurious site for entertaining guests, housing her impressive art collections and wished to leave it behind for the world to enjoy. The mansion is a treasure trove of French and Russian decorative arts, much of which she obtained from the USSR when the government under Stalin was then auctioning off items to finance its war efforts. Linger in the French and Japanese-style gardens after a tour of the estate.

National Cathedral (Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul)

3001 Wisconsin Ave NW

The National Cathedral is the world’s sixth largest cathedral, cut over a period of 83 years of 150,000 tons of stone. Tours are necessary to really see the cathedral, as towers and the crypt are off limits without a guide during the busy season. The organ demonstrations are spectacular, but the cathedral hosts major concerts as well as children’s programming.

President Lincoln’s Cottage

On a hill overlooking downtown Washington is a cottage built for George W. Riggs around 1842. In 1851, the estate was sold to the Federal Government, which purchased it in order to found a home for veteran soldiers. During the Civil War, President Lincoln lived in that cottage on the grounds of the Soldiers’ Home from June into November to escape the heat and distractions of life at the White House. Lincoln first visited the grounds three days after his inauguration and last rode out to the site the day before his assassination. While living at the Cottage for 13 months from 1862-1864, he regularly commuted to the White House. The Cottage opened to the public in 2008.

Rock Creek Cemetery 

Rock Creek Church Yard and Cemetery contributes to the cultural heritage and visual beauty of the District of Columbia. Covering 85 acres, the cemetery is sited on high ground with terrain falling away to the north from the main gate. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church lies opposite the entrance gate toward the center of the cemetery.  The cemetary was designed and laid out in the mid-19th century in a similar manner introduced at Mount Auburn Cemetery, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. There are many mature native trees including the ancient Glebe Oak, with a circumference of more than 17 feet. There are many interesting grave markers, monuments, mausoleums and sculpture reflecting the long history of the cemetery and the status and sensibilities of those buried within it.

Historic Petworth Library

Petworth Neighborhood Library at 4200 Kansas Ave. NW was the sixth neighborhood library to open in the District. The two-and-a-half story library building opened on Jan. 27, 1939. The library, sited on public property donated by the D.C. School Board, was built after Petworth-area organizations waged an extended campaign to obtain a public library in their community.

African American Civil War Memorial & Museum

1925 Vermont Ave NW

Erected in 1998 to recognize the Civil War’s United States Colored Troops (USCT), the 10-foot sculpture and Wall of Honor resides on the eastern side of the U Street Metro Station. The memorial teaches about the African-American experience in the New World from the 16th century through the Civil War, such as the role African American churches played along the Underground Railroad, and USCT Medal of Honor recipients

Lincoln Theatre

1215 U St NW

The Lincoln Theater provides a place with rich history where you can watch or new movie or performance. The theater has hosted performers such as Duke Ellington and has been written about by the likes of Langston Hughes. Just across from the U St. Metro Station and next to Ben’s Chili Bowl, the Lincoln’s prime urban location makes it easy to imagine Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holliday performing there. Once known as the Lincoln Colonnade, it was revamped in recent years to look as grand and sophisticated as its New York Broadway counterparts.

Howard Theatre 

620 T St NW

The bright theatre on a cobblestone square between LeDroit Park and Howard University draws lines before popular performances and events, like Sunday gospel brunches and B.B. King concerts. The Howard has many famous fans dedicated to ensuring it thrives. Smokey Robinson, Quincy Jones and Wyclef Jean are on the honorary board for the theatre’s restoration, which will include a culture and education center with a museum, classrooms, recording studio and offices when complete.

Howard University 

2400 Sixth St NW

Alums of this historically black college, founded in 1867 by Oliver O. Howard, include Thurgood Marshall, Toni Morrison, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Oprah Winfrey and Roberta Flack. “The Yard” in the heart of Howard’s open campus is a great place to relax any time while Howard Homecoming in October is a nationally-known celebration with the crowds to match. Over 100,000 alumni, family and friends attend a gospel show, R&B concert, step and fashion shows, and football game.

Arena Stage

SW Maine Ave & SW 7th St

Arena Stage was one of the nation’s original resident theaters when it was founded in 1950. While it specializes in producing American classics, the venerable theatre company also premieres new works by emerging artists. The theatre raised $125 million and took a decade from conception through construction to complete. With three stages from 200 to 700 seats each, there isn’t a bad seat in the house.

Spirit of Washington

600 Water St SW

The Spirit of Washington cruises by the Washington Monument and Fort McNair, down the Potomac past Old Town Alexandria and the Jones Point Lighthouse and back. Passengers can enjoy a grand buffet, dancing and live music. Holiday, full moon, gospel lunch, cherry blossom and other themed cruises are also available. Slacks, dresses and button downs are recommended during dinner, but casual dress is fine for lunch.

East Potomac Park Golf Course

972 Ohio Dr SW

Located on the banks of the Potomac River, this golf course with two 18-hole options is basic but hassle-free. Where else can you line up your shot with the Washington Monument?

Walter Reed Army Medical Museum 

2500 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, MD 20910

Home of gruesome artifacts such as Abe Lincoln’s teeth, conjoined skeletons and a corpse made of soap, this hidden gem is in the Walter Reed Army Medical Center on Georgia Avenue at Dahlia St.

Fort Stevens Park and Battlefield National Cemetery 

13th & Quackenbos, Washington, DC 20011

The Fort Stevens Park and Battlefield National Cemetary commemorates the battle between Union troops and Confederate Gen. Jubal Early. The general snuck into the city in 1862 by driving down Georgia Avenue and stopped off at the Blair Mansion inn in Silver Spring for a bite to eat. Abraham Lincoln allegedly had his hat shot off here as he observed General Early. Commemorate your visit with a “Gen. Jubal Earlyburger” at nearby Woodside Deli in Silver Spring, MD (9329 Georgia Ave., Forest Glen, MD, near I-495). The dead from the battle were buried in the tiny National Cemetery on Georgia Avenue at the end of Whittier St. (Takoma D.C.)

Takoma Old Town Shopping Center

On the Maryland side of Takoma Park is a 1920’s era collection of small shops featuring a clock tower and a gazebo in Takoma Urban Park. Home of the weekly Farmers’ Market.

 

Kreeger Museum

2401 Foxhall Rd NW

Little known even to locals is this private house-museum with an impressive collection of paintings by the impressionist and early modern masters. The house itself was designed by modernist architects Philip Johnson and Richard Foster. The ride out to the museum will take you through some of the country’s wealthiest neighborhoods.

Hillwood Estate

4155 Linnean Avenue NW

Hillwood Estate is a hidden gem of magnificent proportions. Merriweather Post Hillwood, a prominent businesswoman and heiress to the Post Cereal fortune, built her home next to Rock Creek Park. The estate was to be an extraordinarily stately and luxurious site for entertaining guests, housing for her impressive art collections, and was built with the intention of leaving it behind for the world to enjoy. The mansion contains many French and Russian decorative arts, much of which she obtained from the USSR, whose government at the time under Stalin was then auctioning off a good portion of its cultural heritage to finance its war efforts. Second in grandeur only to the art collection itself are the French and Japanese-style gardens.

National Cathedral (Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul)

3001 Wisconsin Ave NW

A Gothic mammoth and the world’s sixth largest cathedral, the National Cathedral is a huge attraction that draws in many visitors. Cut over a period of 83 years, the cathedral is made up of 150,000 tons of stone. Tours are a must if you really want to see the cathedral, as towers and the crypt are off limits without a guide during the busy season. The organ demonstrations are also spectacular. Check the website for events, as there is often children’s programming as well as major concerts.

African American Civil War Memorial & Museum

1925 Vermont Ave NW

Exit the eastern side of the U Street Metro Station to see this memorial erected in 1998 to recognize the Civil War’s United States Colored Troops (USCT). The 10-foot sculpture and Wall of Honor depicts uniformed soldiers and a sailor amidst the names of more than 200,000 USCT arranged by regiment. You’ll learn about the African-American experience in the New World from the 16th century through the Civil War, such as the role African American churches played along the Underground Railroad, and USCT Medal of Honor recipients.

Lincoln Theatre

1215 U St NW

Watch a new movie or performance in this historic theatre where Duke Ellington once played in the basement. Langston Hughes also wrote a poem about it, which spurred a cultural revival that predated the Harlem Renaissance. Just across from the U St. Metro Station and next to Ben’s Chili Bowl, the Lincoln’s prime urban location makes it easy to imagine Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holliday performing here. Once known as the Lincoln Colonnade, it was revamped in recent years to look as grand and sophisticated as its New York Broadway counterparts.

Howard Theatre 

620 T St NW

The bright theatre on a cobblestone square between LeDroit Park and Howard University draws lines before popular performances and events, like Sunday gospel brunches and B.B. King concerts. The Howard has many famous fans dedicated to ensuring it thrives; Smokey Robinson, Quincy Jones and Wyclef Jean are on the honorary board for the theatre’s restoration, which will include a culture and education center with a museum, classrooms, recording studio and offices when complete.

Howard University 

2400 Sixth St NW

Alums of this historically black college founded in 1867 by Oliver O. Howard include Thurgood Marshall, Toni Morrison, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Oprah Winfrey and Roberta Flack. “The Yard” in the heart of Howard’s open campus is a nice place to rest and people watch any time, Howard Homecoming in October is a nationally-known celebration with the crowds to match. Over 100,000 alumni, family and friends attend a gospel show, R&B concert, step and fashion shows, and football game.

National Zoological Park

3001 Connecticut Ave NW

Unlike many zoos around the nation, visitors can enter the National Zoo free of cost. This zoo is home to 400-species spread out over 163-acres. Arrive early for a limited spot in the zoo’s parking lot or enter on Connecticut Avenue from the equidistant Woodley Park or Cleveland Park metro stations. The zoo is home to pandas (including a recent baby panda, Bao Bao), who are symbolic diplomatic gifts to the U.S. from China. Bring your own picnic to enjoy the sight of the animals while you eat or enjoy food and beverages from one of the many concession stands.

Rock Creek Park

Throughout Woodley Park and Cleveland Park

Rock Creek Park, which spans 1,752 acres from Georgetown up into Maryland, is the perfect place to picnic, hike or bike along memorials, wooden areas and streams. Carter Barron Amphitheater offers a summer concert venue in the woods, a world-class tennis facility, Rock Creek Golf Course, a horse barn and the Rock Creek Nature Center, which even has a planetarium. Don’t miss evening star gazing sessions with the National Capital Astronomers or regular astronomy shows for children on weekends.

The Uptown Theatre 

3426 Connecticut Ave NW

The single, concave screen in this movie theatre is about 2,800 square feet and one of the biggest in the area. It opened in 1936, but lines still wrap around the door on opening nights for new blockbusters. There is also a strip of local eateries that are perfect for date nights and pre- and post- movie munching.